On 7 July 2005 Britain experienced its first ever suicide attack. Four bombs exploded in central London, killing 52 people and injuring over 700. When Scotland Yard launched one of the biggest investigations in its history, another first was quickly uncovered: the suicide bombers were home-grown, they were young British men, attacking their own country. A handful of scientists have dedicated their lives to understanding the mind of the suicide bomber. It's a field that has grown rapidly in recent years as suicide attacks have become the weapon of choice for extremist groups around the world. These scientists are challenging our preconceptions about who these suicide bombers are. Much of the early research was conducted by Ariel Merari from Tel Aviv University. He interviewed the friends and family of suicide bombers, as well as those who were stopped before their bombs went off. Merari tried to piece together a personality type capable of such acts. The unsettling finding that emerged was that suicide bombers weren't mad, weren't psychopaths, in fact they did not have any psychological flaws that set them apart. After the 9/11 attacks on America in 2001, ex-CIA case officer and forensic psychiatrist Marc Sageman decided to look beyond the individual. He wanted to know exactly how the 9/11 cell had formed. Looking for patterns in their behaviour, he noticed that the leaders of the cell all joined al-Qaeda while they were living abroad. As he extended his research, he ...

Film Duration: 49 min .