The Jehovah’s Witnesses are a religious organization with, reportedly, over eight million members across the world. Jehovah’s Witnesses are bible literalists who believe in Adam and Eve, Noah’s Arc, and maintain that Armageddon will occur in the near future. The organization also has many rules that members must follow. For example, the organization prohibits any sexual contact outside marriage, they prohibit holiday celebrations such as birthdays and Christmas, any political action such as voting, blood transfusions in the case of a medical emergency, they discourage any university education that is not in the trades and the organization has a stern stance against homosexuality. There are also restrictions on how Jehovah’s Witnesses should look, what they watch, what they read, what they listen to, what they do for recreation, and the people they should surround themselves with. While some witnesses may find solace in the organizations rigid ideology, others find it difficult to adhere to its rules leading to anxiety and depression. Those feelings of anxiety and depression are compounded by the fear that breaking the rules or leaving the organization will result in them being disfellowshipped and shunned by friends and family. I will be talking to former Jehovah’s Witnesses about the struggles they faced being members of the organization and how their lives changed after they were disfellowshipped.